Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Seedling compost tea me lol!'s Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Lookin for THAT skunk, 613
    Posts
    206
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Rep Power
    12

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default some basic fermented plant extract info and recipes

    just going through some old stuff, thought id share..

    Through the ages herbs have been used in cooking for their flavor, in medicine for their healing properties and for their fragrance and cosmetic properties. However little has been written about their value to the organic grower.
    Specific herbs may have one or many uses to the organic gardener. They can act as insect repellants, compost activators, DIY organic liquid fertilizers and good companion plants which strengthen those grown near them. They can also impart valuable nutrients into compost and enrich soil.

    The chart here lists the 16 nutrients which plants need for healthy growth and shows where these nutrients are obtained - from the air, water, or soil. It is the soil that herbs play their greatest role, giving up their valuable source of nutrients either as decayed matter (compost) or as liquid fertilizer.

    NUTRIENTS SOURCES
    Carbon and oxygen AIR
    Hydrogen and oxygen WATER

    Major Nutrients

    1. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria which live in nodules found in the roots of legumes, combine the N in nitrogen: the air with other elements in the soil to make it available to plants.

    2. Decayed plant or animal matter.

    Phosphorus
    Potassium

    Secondry Nutrients SOIL
    Calcium
    Magnesium Trace Elements
    Sulphur Iron
    Copper
    Zinc
    Boron
    Chlorine
    Manganese
    Molybdenum

    Most of these minerals and nitrogen can be supplied in part by various herbs which are allowed to decompose in compost and are returned to the soil.

    The following herbs provide the minerals and other nutrients required by plants for healthy growth:

    NUTRIENTS - HERBS
    Nitrogen - Comfrey, clover, legumes
    Phosphorus - Alfalfa, valerian (does not provide phosphorus,stimulates phosphorus activity in the soil around it).
    Potassium - Tansy, couch grass, coltsfoot, comfrey, sunflowers, thistles, alfalfa, borage, celery.
    Calcium - Chamomile, comfrey, borage, lupins, horsetail, plantain.
    Magnesium - Horsetail, alfalfa.
    Sulphur - Plantain, broom, coltsfoot, garlic.
    Iron - Dandelion, horsetail, alfalfa, nettle, sorrel.
    Copper - Yarrow, nettle, garlic.
    Chlorine - Horsetail, couch grass, dandelion.
    Boron - Spurges (Euphorbia peplus, E. heliascopia, E.lathyrus, E.amygdaloides).
    Manganese - Garlic.
    Zinc & Molybdenum - Have not found any herbs containing these two minerals.

    Deficiencies of these minerals are more likely to be found in soils which are very acid or very alkaline. If plants grown in very alkaline soil appear yellowish in spite of every attention, the mineral most likely to be deficient is iron. Iron is necessary for the formation of chlorophyl, the green coloring matter in the leaves, and a high level of alkalinity in the soil makes much of the iron inavailable to the plants. Try a liquid manure spray made with herbs rich in iron to correct this deficiency, or, if you prefer, use iron chelates.

    The most common deficiency in a very acid soil is magnesium, also necessary in the formation of chlorophyll. Spray the soil with a solution made of horsetail or alfalfa to correct the deficiency and put plenty of these plants in the compost box to prevent any further deficiency. See the following recipes.

    Nutrients stored up in plants may all be used to advantage in the form of a liquid fertilizer, which is srayed around the roots of plants, or used as a 'foliar-feed' which is sprayed on the leaves.
    There are a number of herbs which are of great benefit to anyone who grows their plants organically and, in particular, to anyone who makes their own compost.

    Using these herbs in the compost box does one of two things. The herbs will impart their own valuable nutrients into the compost heap and so enrich it, or the addition of two herbs in particular, yarrow and nettle, will help activate the compost and so decompose it in up to half the 'normal' time allowed - about six weeks instead of the usual three months.

    The following herbs impart valuable nutrients into the compost:
    COMFREY - Nitrogen, calcium
    TANSY - Potassium
    THISTLES - Potassium
    NETTLES - Iron, copper, calcium
    EQUISETUM - Calcium, iron, magnesium
    DANDELION - Iron, copper
    LUPINS - Calcium (used to reclaim sandy soil - L.luteus)
    SPURGES - Boron (see Euphorbia varieties in the previous list)
    VETCH & LEGUMES - Nitrogen
    BORAGE - Potassium, calcium
    SUNFLOWERS - Potassium
    YARROW - Copper
    PLANTAIN - Calcium
    MELON LEAVES - Calcium

    VALUABLE HERBS FOR THE ORGANIC GARDENER

    Comfrey (Symphytum officinale)

    1. Comfrey is rich in nitrogen, potassium and natural calcium and its chemical compostion is said to be almost the same as that of farmyard manure.
    2. Comfrey decomposes very quickly and so is useful not only in the compost heap, but also as a green manure, chopped up and spread around the base of plants.
    3. Comfrey has often been used to break up new, heavy soil, since its long roots grow deep down into the subsoil, making available valuable nutrients to the topsoil.

    Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

    1. Yarrow is particularly rich in copper and also contains useful amounts of nitrates and phosphates.
    2. Yarrow is an excellent compost activator. Tests done in England show that only a very small amount of the plant is needed to 'send off' the compost. The most effective qunatity has proved to be one part yarrow to 10,000 parts compost, ie, two leaves of yarrow chopped finely and mixed through one cubic yard of compost.
    3. It has been found that root excretions produced by the yarrow plant strengthen neighboring plants and help them to resist disease.
    4. When yarrow is grown next to various culinary and fragrant herbs, it increases the yield of oils produced by these herbs and so intensifies their flavors and scents.
    5. When yarrow is rubbed between the fingers and pressed onto a cut it will immediately stop the bleeding (in most cases).

    Nettles (Urtica dioica)

    1. Nettles are very rich in iron, copper and natural calcium. These nutrients, which the nettle removed from the soil, are replaced when the plant is composted and dug back into the soil.
    2. Nettles, like yarrow, help neighboring plants to grow strong and resist disease.
    3. Nettles also increase the volatile oil content of the plants grown next to them, especially peppermint.
    4. Nettles also act as a compost activator. Their influence on soil can be seen around their own roots - it is always very rich in humus.
    5. Nettles stimulate the activity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the soil. A very rich liquid fertilizer can be made from nettles ( see recipes).

    Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis and Matricaria chamomilla)

    1. Chamomile is one on the richest plants in natural calcium.
    2. English chamomile, which likes to be trodden on and makes a good lawn, has long had the reputation of being the 'plant physician', keeping neighboring plants healthy and disease-free and is reputed to be able to heal sick plants.
    3. A tea made from chamomile flowers prevents 'damping off' in seedlings. Steep a handful of flowers in a pint of cold water for several hours. Water over the seed bed.
    4. Any tea left over can be poured over the compost bin since the lime in chamomile acts as a sweetener and helps to prevent the compost smelling.

    Dandelion (Taraxacum officinate)
    Dandelion is very rich in iron and also contains amonts of copper, potassium, sulphur and manganese. Audrey Wynne Hatfield said of the dandelion "As a garden weed, the dandelion, like the nettle, absorbs about three times the amount of iron from the soil taken up by any other plant. It is a miser too, for copper, and for anything else worthwhile in the soil nutrients that it can lay its roots to." She went on to say that "the thieving dandelion is only acceptable to plants when it is composted, rotted down, disintegrated to make available its hoard of iron, copper, and other things they need. Or it can be made into a liquid fertilizer which can only remedy other plants' deficiencies."

    The dandelion's biggest drawback as far as the gardener is concerned is that it is charged with ethelene gas, which hinders the growth of neighboring plants and causes them to produce premature, dwarfed fruit.

    Horsetail (Equisetum arvense)
    Horsetail is a rich source of silica and contains a number of useful minerals, including iron, magnesium and calcium. The stems of this plant are so hard that simply steeping it in boiling water until it cools is not sufficient to draw out its valuable nutrients. (See recipes.)

    Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)
    Tansy is very rich in potassium. Dorothy Hall says of it "Tansy is one of the most mineral rich of all herbs. It is a great plant for the organic gardener. Its value in the compost bin is enormous. Bulging with potassium and assorted resins, oils and acids, its leaves provide many elements otherwise lacking. Whenever you cut back the plant, and cut it back you can many times even in one season, strop the leaves from their fibrous stems, add half to the compost bin and mix it well in, and keep the other half to dry."
    Dried tansy is used to repel ants, flies, fleas and other insects. Always be sure to bruise the leaves first to release the insect-repelling oils.

    Valerian (Valeriana officinalis)
    Valerian is important to the gardener because of its ability to stir up and increase phosphorus activity in the soil around it. It also attracts earthworms.

    Elderberry (Sambucua nigra & S.canadensis)
    It is said that if a compost heap is made under an elderberry shrub or tree, the excretions from the tree roots, together with the fallen leaves, will assist fermentation and will help to produce especially good compost.

    DIY LIQUID FERTILIZER RECIPES

    Horsetail Spray
    Gather plants in the early morning before they are affected by the sun. Cover a handful of the fresh plants with a pint of water and bring to the boil. Remove from the heat and allow to cool, keeping it covered while cooling.
    Strain the liquid free of bits that might clog up the spray and dilute with four parts of water. If using as a foliar-feed, add a dessertspoon of biodegradable detergent and stir for 10 minutes. The soap helps the liquid to adhere to the foliage. This is not necessary if it is to be sprayed onto the soil. This mixture should be used as soon as it is made.

    Nettle Spray
    Steep a bunch of nettles in some cold water and in three weeks they will be completley digested and ready for use. This liquid is used (a) as a fertilizer, (b) as an insect repellant - it keeps black aphis on broadbean and plant lice under control - and (c) it can be sprayed onto plants to help make them more resistant to disease and harsh conditions such as drought.

    Bio-dynamic Horsetail Spray (Preparation 508)
    This is the recipe from Audrey Wynne Hatfield
    This is infused from the stems that arise after the unbranched brownish shoots bearing the spores have disappeared in late May (in Europe). the succeeding branching shoots, like little pine trees, are the richest in the silica and may be used fresh or dried.

    To make the spray, cover 1 1/2 ozs dried horsetail with four quarts cold water, and bring to the boil.
    Simmer for 20 minutes only then, remove from the heat and cool, covered for 24 hours.

    Next day, strain the liquid from bits and use it, if fresh plants are used, put two good hand fulls in a pan and cover with water.

    Simmer for 20 minutes. Allow to cool and infuse, covered, for 24 hours. Strain and dilute with two parts water to one part liquid.

    Dried horsetail can be obtained from health food stores and herbalists. This recipe is also a particularly effective fungicide for deterring black spot on roses and mildew on any plant. It also prevents rust on some plants -
    Be safe ! vacuum purge your bho... it looks cool
    Not getting cancer is worth spending the money..

    OPERATION SKU is coming to where ever it is.. Skunks Needed
    I want to know and own everything skunky.. we can rebuild it
    we have the technology. Contact me for info


  2. #2
    Flowering Member Tweedybird's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Tweedville, Canada
    Posts
    1,829
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Rep Power
    11

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    I'm wondering about using FPE, but the question is how does the alcohol not hurt the microherd? The extract can be diluted, it still has alcohol. That's another reason (alcohol) why I'm leery of adding yeast to anything. It has a lot of vitamins, which the plant can't use directly. Do I can ferment pineapple or papaya as some sites suggest, but I could also just make wine...
    Hippy dippy organic grower

  3. #3
    Flowering Member Tweedybird's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Tweedville, Canada
    Posts
    1,829
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Rep Power
    11

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Borrowed from another site:

    Organic feeding provides great results. A good organic grow starts with the soil. (look at subcool's section on that. he knows soil.) Im going to go over strictly what to do once the plant is in the dirt, and you still need to feed them something. Feeding the plants the right stuff is key to successful grows, and knowing what to feed and when, is needed for every grower.

    If your plant has some sort of issue, theres threads on that Guide to Nutrient Deficiency or Toxicity . this thread is gonna cover what do to AFTER you notice a deficiency, or just to keep a healthy garden. this will be using only organic nutrients. Ive purchased bottles of guano, and molasses and wondered... what now? well this is what now.

    **note: most of these teas/mixtures involve some mixing, but a lot of wait time. this is to fully let the properties of the substance combine with the water, and for microbial activity to start. Do not skip the waiting**

    Vegetative Teas:

    Worm humus:
    Origin:this mix is produced from the excrement of worms. they ingest organic material and you end up with this. The best quality of worm humus is going to be from the Californian worms.
    Provides: water soluble, and boosts microbes in the soil
    Preparation: In 5 liters of water, add in 400gr (about 2 cups) and let it sit for 2 days. stirring every so often to keep it well mixed and the water somewhat oxygenated.
    Applicationuring the watering, mixing 1 part of poo-juice with 3 parts water. you can add this in weekly.

    Blood Meal:
    Origin: After removing and drying blood from animals(usually in a slaughterhouse), it is ground up into a fine powder.
    Provides about 12-15%N, 1.2%P, and 1%k
    Preparation: in a container, add 1 part blood meal to 9 parts water. cover. over 1 week, open to burp the mix, and stir. after, filter with coffee strainer.
    Application: Applying usually only when N deficiency is noted, add to water to create a 10%-25% strength solution.

    Gypsum
    Origin: CaSO4. Its a rock basically, you can find it naturally outdoors, or (probably easier) at a local plant shop.
    Provides: Activates healthy microbial activity. Corrects salinity (toxic salt levels). Provides sulfur, calcium and potassium. Regulates pH, and most importantly, helps in the absorption of N.
    Preparation: add 1 pound of gypsum powder (use a mortar and pistil if its too coarse) to the inside of a nylon stocking, or other fine screen material. place this inside a container with 5L of water. Cover. leave for 1-2 weeks, opening the container to stir briskly every few days.
    Application: Add it in with the water when pH is unstable, max 10% strength (so dilute it!). dilute it to 5% if mixing it with a N tea, and can be used weekly.

    Fishmeal
    Origin: obtained from dried, ground fish.
    Provides: 8%N, 7%P, trace elements.
    Preparation: mix 10% of this powder with 90% water in a container. leave it a week covered, and opening it to burp out the gas (dont breathe it in, smells). Filter at the end of the week.
    Application: Dilute the mix, 1part fishgoop with 10 parts water. add in weekly with the feedings, or when a N/P deficiency is noted.

    Bat Guano
    Origin: decomposed bat poo. preferably pasteurized (since bats can and do carry disease, like rabies!)
    Provides: High in N, but also contains P and trace elements. Fresher guano has higher N rating
    Preparation: 2 tablespoons of bat poo in 4 -5 liters of water. let sit for 1 week
    Application: mix the finished poo water, 1 part to 3 parts water. use every 2 weeks.

    Mixed Teas: This is ok for veg + flowering.

    Compost Tea (one of my favorites, as i use ground up male plants, or the sticks/stems/fan leaves of the harvested females for this)
    Origin: The easiest to come across commercially, or to make at home. this is used worldwide with a variety of ingredients.
    Provides: A big boost of microorganisms, helps feed the plants, and boosts a plant's immune system. NPK ratios vary depending the type of compost made.
    Preparation: Place a bunch of dead plants in a nylon stocking or screen, put that inside a bucket with about 15L of water, adding water as it evaporates (which means leave it uncovered). after 2 weeks, dump the inside of the bag/screen/stocking back with the rest of your compost pile outside or throw it away or whatever.
    Application: If you want to foliar feed this, filter it well, then 1:8 ratio of tea to water. otherwise, just add it in when watering, at a 1:5 ratio. use it every 2 weeks.

    Alfalfa Tea. (can also be used during flowering)
    Origin: your rabbit's food. this is ground up alfalfa, leaves, stems.
    Provides: 2.5%n, 5%p, and 2%k.
    Preparation: grabbing a nylon sock and filling with 1 part of the alfalfa, setting it into a bucket with 10 parts water. leave it for a week to create a strong tea.
    Application: use every 2 weeks, diluted 1part tea with 10 parts water.

    Manures
    Origin: the business end of various animals.
    Provides: This really depends on what the animal ate, and what the animal is. Rough estimates are:
    Cows: .6%N-.3%P-.3%K
    horse: .6%N-.6%P-.4%k
    Rabbit: .5%N-1.2%P-.5%K
    Sheep: .8%N-.5%P-.4%K
    Pigs: .6%N-.6%P-.4%K
    Preparation: 1 part crap to 10 parts water, in a bucket. 2 weeks, stirring periodically. (again, this is better for the nylon stockings, otherwise your gonna have to filter it - yuck)
    Application: 1 part poop water to 1 part water. can be used every 2 weeks.

    Fruit tea, with or without Molasses.
    Origin: made with fermenting fruits. its recommended to add molasses for flowering.
    Provides: Rich in NPK, but also contains calcium and some other trace elements. Very rich in microbial activity. Using molasses adds a large amounts of carbs and can contribute to fungus (in high heat grows)
    Preparation: Cut fruits into small pieces. place in a container and cover them with molasses( OR cut up fruits, place into a ziploc bag with NO molasses or air) Let it sit for 2 weeks, opening it periodically to let out gases. filter.
    Application: 1 tablespoon of fruit rot juice (ew) to 1 liter of water. use it every 10 days.

    Flowering Teas:

    Banana Peel Tea.
    Origin: Bananas. Cheap to make. eat the banana, use the peels.
    Provides: Strong Potassium Boost. ideal for flowering.
    Preparation: after selecting 4 bananas, and eating the insides, place the 4 peels into a pot, with 4 cups of water (1L). You can also add in 2 tablespoons of molasses. Bring to a boil. let boil for 5 minutes. remove the peels. let cool. place in jars for storage.
    Application: mix this 1 part banana goop to 2 parts water. use every 2 weeks.

    Sea Weed
    Origin: algae or kelp, dried, ground into a powder.
    Provides: Lots of K, and trace elements, aminoacids, vitamins, hormones.
    Preparation: 100grams of algae powder + 2Liters of water, let sit overnight.
    Application: mix 1 part of sea weed juice to 3 parts water, and apply during waterings. can be used every watering.

    Paper Ash tea.
    Origin: This powder is obtained from burned paper. make sure the paper has no pigments (inks), glues, adhesives, or plastic covering. just plain paper. the cheaper the stuff, the better.
    Provides: 5% P and 2% K
    Preparation: Burn the paper fully. Ground up the ash. 100g of ash mixed with 2 L of water. let sit 10 days, then filter.
    Application: use every 15 days, mixed 1 part ash juice to 2 parts water.

    Bonemeal
    Origin: Bones, crushed, ground up.
    Provides: some N (3%?) and around 7% of P. high in calcium
    Preparation: cook in a pot for 10 minutes, 200grams of bonemeal with 6 liters of water, and 1/2 cup of baking soda. let cool, then remove any grease that may have formed at the top. filter the rest of the mix.
    Application: Use 1 part bone water to 3 parts water. use it at the start of the 12/12 cycle, or the start of flowering. will last the entire grow.
    Hippy dippy organic grower

  4. #4
    Shadbot 4.20 Shadimar's Avatar

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cannaba
    Posts
    7,760
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 884/0
    Given: 474/1
    Rep Power
    27


    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Ferment the peels, do not smoke them.

    There is no such thing as Bananadine.
    ♪♫♪♫♪♪♫♪
    Ceci n'est pas une signature du forum.
    Thank You for using S.h.a.d.i.m.a.r.: the world's most poorly coded chatbot.
    Substantially Humanlike Application Determined Insufficient Mediocre And Relatively annoying.

  5. #5
    Flowering Member Tweedybird's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Tweedville, Canada
    Posts
    1,829
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Rep Power
    11

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    lmao. Yes, I will not be smoking banana peel. I'm actually allergic to banana. However, a banana seaweed tea would likely be a good PK boost.
    Hippy dippy organic grower

  6. #6
    Shadbot 4.20 Shadimar's Avatar

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cannaba
    Posts
    7,760
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 884/0
    Given: 474/1
    Rep Power
    27


    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Both are high in potassium which is alkaline but I'm not sure where you're getting the phosphorus to balance the pH.
    ♪♫♪♫♪♪♫♪
    Ceci n'est pas une signature du forum.
    Thank You for using S.h.a.d.i.m.a.r.: the world's most poorly coded chatbot.
    Substantially Humanlike Application Determined Insufficient Mediocre And Relatively annoying.

  7. #7
    Flowering Member Tweedybird's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Tweedville, Canada
    Posts
    1,829
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Rep Power
    11

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Wouldn't just diluting them be ok? Also I have nettle, comfrey & horsetail fpe coming along. Was going to add the banana seaweed tea to these, and all diluted in water. Maybe just leave the banana for the compost and stick to the nettle, comfrey & horsetail fpe with seaweed? The molasses used in fermenting has phosphorous.
    Hippy dippy organic grower

  8. #8
    Shadbot 4.20 Shadimar's Avatar

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cannaba
    Posts
    7,760
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 884/0
    Given: 474/1
    Rep Power
    27


    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    I don't know if it's going to be high enough to cause any problems, for all I know it's chealated by the time it reaches the soil.
    ♪♫♪♫♪♪♫♪
    Ceci n'est pas une signature du forum.
    Thank You for using S.h.a.d.i.m.a.r.: the world's most poorly coded chatbot.
    Substantially Humanlike Application Determined Insufficient Mediocre And Relatively annoying.

  9. #9
    Vegetative Member

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    728
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 15/0
    Given: 2/0
    Rep Power
    18

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Nice info to be found when searching the archives.

    Thing is I have never heard of some of these items, or at least have no idea where. Going to stop at the Farmer store and browse around to see what cheap amendments I can source there as it is just a short drive away here in the country and no need to goto the "city"

    Timothy Grass ?!?!?!?!
    anyone?

    Wmart had smaller bales of alfalfa and a good sized one of this timothy grass?
    I never knew Tim grew Grass let alone worth buying. Ahh Do you smoke it? LOL

    While I am at it . . .
    Molasses
    I thought you had to be part of the special decoder ring club to find the stuff!
    No don't bother looking for it in the baking asile.
    Not anywhere any other sugar's with the exception of the Syrup.
    Yep you guess it, Look for good Ole Auntie Jemima
    and there basking with all it's splendor 1 kind Grandma's ( wal mart had it cheaper buy a dollar and a brear rabbit brand or something )

    On a side note I seen what I was not familiar with Agave Nectur? ( Need to read the label closer next time. )
    What sort of benifits come from it?
    Last edited by Shadimar; 02-18-2013 at 09:05 PM. Reason: Merged Posts

  10. #10
    Seedling organic in ottawa's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    pulling the strings
    Posts
    236
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 7/0
    Given: 3/0
    Rep Power
    9

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by undereducated View Post
    Thing is I have never heard of some of these items, or at least have no idea where. Going to stop at the Farmer store and browse around to see what cheap amendments I can source there as it is just a short drive away here in the country and no need to goto the "city"


    most stuff ctm listed for fpe is found growing wild in the country. not right now obviously.
    but buy/ borrow from library/ print off the net the pictures of all of the plants you want and go for a long walk with a few j's

    farm or feed store is second or out of season choice.
    and always strive for local, nature is healthy everywhere,
    and in every different place has evolved different things to be complete..

    sometimes people end up sourcing different stuff from all over the globe
    for tooooo much money
    and all do the same things or close too
    or dont work together that well.

    locally you have everything you need....
    and you dont need money, just time
    -oio

    Quote Originally Posted by undereducated View Post
    . . .
    Molasses...

    Agave Nectur?

    ----->Blackstrap<--- molasses, not fancy or other.. but blackstrap molasses is at the Feed store/Bulk barn

    agave is not as good and is alot more expensive... dont bother unless you have it and even then, go buy blackstrap..

    -oio
    Last edited by Shadimar; 02-18-2013 at 09:06 PM. Reason: Merged Posts

Similar Threads

  1. Plant Extract Fermentation: Stinging Nettle
    By MidnightToker in forum Organic Cultivation
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 03-01-2013, 05:14 AM
  2. Plant Extract Fermentation: Alfalfa
    By MidnightToker in forum Organic Cultivation
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 01-01-2013, 08:44 PM
  3. Plant Extract Fermentation: Comfrey
    By MidnightToker in forum Organic Cultivation
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-23-2012, 10:44 AM
  4. Basic As Basic Gets
    By fylthevoyd in forum Recipes
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-11-2010, 01:28 PM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-21-2008, 02:44 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •