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Thread: Organic Tea's

  1. #1
    Flowering Member PharmaPharmer's Avatar

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    Default Organic Tea's

    After seeing dramatic results in the health of my plants after first using homemade earth worm casting tea I got to thinking. Why not try some other products in tea form. So when I was stocking up for my next grow i grabbed a bag of Ancient Organics Bat Guano Gro (10-2-1).

    In my first attempt I added 2 cups Guano and 3 cups earth worm castings to 3 ga water (pH 7) with an arreator. The first problem was that I was realy stoned and added the water first so it all floated on the surface. I added some Earth Juice Assist (a Yucca extract based wetting agent) and broke out the cordless mixer. The stuff foamed up with areation to the point where I had to go in and "break" the foam 5 or six times a day to keep it all mixed up and extracting. I did this for 2 or 3 days if i recall. I strained it and added 6 ga water to it and then added my normal ferts (PBP Grow, Liquid Karma, Sweet) and pH corrected to 5.9 with Citric Acid.

    Overnight the plants turned a deep dark green and the leaves look nice and glossy. They have been watered twice with normal ferts sans the tea and are growing at a nice rate.

    I just started my next tea which is 3 cups each of the guano and earth worm castings. Then I added 3ga 160*F water. This will definatly have a nagative impact on benificial microbes present in the worm castings but this is a fert extraction rather than a microbe innoculation.
    The effect of adding the hot water made the wetting process much more efficient and the foaming is minimal. The soulables should extract more efficiently as a result. I will arreate it to promote mixing and to prevent anerobe infection. Depending on the color of the final product, which is my only guage (other than plant response) of concentration I may add a little Maxicrop Liquified Seaweed.

    I'll post results here after application.
    What's the difference between a pun and a fart? One is a shift of wit.


  2. #2
    Zygote

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    Koi Pond Water is huge in Nitrogen.
    Well at least Mine is.
    Composted Steer Manure Tea is also a must try.

  3. #3
    Flowering Member salmayo's Avatar

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    I don't use ingredients that cause as much foam as yours, but I know what you mean. Molasses is my main foam causing agent, in addition to microbial activity.

    Perhaps you could use periodic bubbling timed to your schedule to conveniently come on and off just before you break the foam, and then just bubble it for as long as you think it needs just before use. I would think that the oxygen levels would be high enough to avoid anaerobic conditions while allowing the foam ingredients to stay down in the liquid for better extration.

    The warm water was a good idea to speed up the extration.

    I saw the similar results in the leaves soon after using my first oxygenated tea as a bioactive booster foliar feed. I noticed the leaves seemed less thin and paperry, and more thick and fleshy (beefed up, as it were).

    My oxygenated teas are intended to burn out the carbs and I've tailored my method a bit to. I skim off the foam as unwanted protein scum that cloggs hydro emitters and foliar sprayers. Another method to rid foam is to use a fermetation type "Blow Off" tube exiting into a jug with hydrogen peroxide in the bottom to reduce odors, which is an issue indoors.

    Kareem has a good point about fish castings contributing to the nutrient profile of their water. I have 60 gallons of aquariums going and using this tank water for making my oxygenated teas adds pre-extracted nutrients in an oxygenated solution that is dechlorinated. Cycling water through the tanks keeps the fish happy to, since it improves their water quality by removing Nitrogen compounds. Cleaning the silt out of the tank gravel yeilds a stronger medium that is good for boosting my outdoor planters and good for fortifying new potting soil or transplanting. A couple of gallons a day is 14 gallons a week, equates to approximately changing 25% of the tank water per week, which is what is recommended (required) to maintain water quality for healthy fish.

    Aquarium water is perfect of rooting cuttings to. It is loaded with nutrients. It's tempoerature is arround 75F. It's oxygenated. And the tops have convenient built in lighting. Now that I think of it, I've had 100% success with just putting cutting in the back of the tank and watching for roots ( 0 maintenance rooter).
    The City of Chico has the highest per capita MJ consumption in America... ...and it doesn't even feel like work.

  4. #4
    NFT4me
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    Quote Originally Posted by PharmaPharmer
    . I added some Earth Juice Assist (a Yucca extract based wetting agent) and broke out the cordless mixer. The stuff foamed up with areation to the point where I had to go in and "break" the foam 5 or six times a day to keep it all mixed up and extracting. I did this for 2 or 3 days if i recall..
    this is the problem with the foam, the wetting agent,in the days before surfactants people used dish soap to achive the same desired effect.
    i see the reason for yucca, its a main ingredient in liquid karma,and has microbial benefits, and the use of a geling agent is sugested atleast once per container, to even out moiture...but over use of gelling agents in the medium leads to damged root hairs and slowed nutrient uptake, resulting in shock, and so on...
    i would phase out the wetting agent...

  5. #5
    Tokin Indian ojibman's Avatar

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    I am going to go with some alfalfa teas this year as they contain a compound that increases growth , can't remember the name but studying it looks like its worth a try, along with my Guano,s also. Just going to buy some pellets and disolve when needed as I do not believe shelf life is very long.
    I Was Indian Before Being Indian Was Cool.

  6. #6
    Embryo

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    tocopherol... shelf life for alfalfa is forever, if its stored dry...

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    Tokin Indian ojibman's Avatar

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    Here's a really cool flowering tea I like a lot. This is meant for the first half of flowering by the way not the 2nd half:

    Per 1.5 gallons of distilled/rain or R/O water and allowed to bubble with an airstone for 24-48 hrs:

    * 2 teaspoon Blackstrap Molasses
    * 2 teaspoon Fox Farms All Purpose 5-5-5
    * 1/2 cup Earthworm castings
    * 2 teaspoon liquid Maxicrop or liquid seaweed/kelp extract; or, 1/4 teaspoon of dry water soluable kelp/seaweed extract.
    * 2 teaspoon Fox Farms High P Bat Guano (PoM)
    * 1 tablespoon Alaskan Fishy Ferts, liquid 5-1-1
    * 2 teaspoon Fox Farms Big Bloom

    Before use cut this tea 50/50 with pure water as above and you have 3 gallons of killer tea. This tea after cut will remain good for about 2 days depending on ambient temps, but at around low-mid 70's 2 days, up into the 80's and only a day.

    You only really wanna use this prolly once right into 12/12 but if you are running larger plants in smaller containers you *could* use this as needed if you wanna
    I Was Indian Before Being Indian Was Cool.

  8. #8
    Tokin Indian ojibman's Avatar

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    Manures


    source N P K comments
    Rabbit manure 2.4 1.4 0.6 Most concentrated of animal manures in fresh form.
    Cow manure (dairy) 0.6 0.2 0.5 Often contains weed seeds, should be hot composted.
    Steer manure 0.7 0.3 0.4 Often contains weed seeds, should be hot composted if fresh.
    Chicken manure 1.1 0.8 0.5 Fast acting, breaks down quickest of all manures.
    Use carefully, may burn. Also, stinks like hell - composting definitely recommended.
    Horse manure 0.7 0.3 0.6 Medium breakdown time.
    Duck manure 0.6 1.4 0.5 .
    Sheep manure 0.7 0.3 0.9 .
    Worm castings 0.5 0.5 0.3 50% organic material plus 11 trace minerals. Great for seedlings, will not burn.
    Is a form of compost, so doesn't need composting.
    Desert Bat Guano 8 4 1 Also contains trace elements. Fast-acting, mix in soil or as tea (1 C guano to 5 gal. water).
    Cave Bat Guano 3 10 1 .
    Fossilized Seabird Guano 1 10 1 Slow release over 3 to 12 weeks, best used as an addition to potting mix.
    Peruvian Seabird Guano (pelletized) 12 12 2.5 Legendary fertilizer of the Incas. Use in soil as a long lasting fertilizer, or make into tea (1 tsp pellets to 1 gallon water).

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Note: it is recommended to first compost any fresh manure before you use it for 2 reasons:
    1) to lessen the chance of harmful pathogens.
    2) to break down the manure to make it more usable to the plant (and reduce the smell!)
    The rates for pig or human manure are not listed because of the high rate of harmful pathogens they contain.
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    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Organic meals


    source N P K comments
    Blood Meal 11 0 0 Highest N of all organic sources, very fast acting if made into tea.
    Bone Meal (steamed) 1 11 0 Releases nutrients slowly.
    Caution: European farmers should not use because of the risk of spreading Mad Cow Disease; growers elsewhere may face the same issue.
    Cottonseed Meal 6 2.5 1.5 If farming organically, check the source. May be heavily treated with pesticides.
    Fish Scrap 5 3 3 Use in compost or work in soil several months before using. Usually slightly alkaline.
    Fish Emulsion 4 1 1 Also adds 5% sulfur. Good N source for seedlings, won't burn.
    Kelp Meal 1 0.5 2.5 Provides 60 trace elements, plus growth-promoting hormones and enzymes.
    Soybean Meal 7 0.5 2.3 .
    Coffee Grounds 2 0.3 0.2 Highly acidic, best for use in alkaline soils.
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    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Minerals

    source N P K comments
    Greensand 0 1.5 7 Mined from old ocean deposits; used as soil conditioner; it holds water and is high in iron, magnesium, and silica - 32 trace minerals in all.
    Eggshells 1.2 0.4 0.1 Contais calcium plus trace minerals. Dry first, then grind to powder.
    Limestone (dolomitic) 0 0 0 Raises pH, 51% calcium and 40% magnesium.
    Limestone (calcitic) 0 0 0 Raises pH, 65-80% calcium, 3-15% magnesium.
    Crustacean Shells 4.6 3.52 0 Contain large amounts of lime. Should be ground as finely as possible for best results.
    Wood Ashes 0 1.5 7 Very fast acting and highly alkaline (usually used to raise pH). Contains many micronutrients.
    Crushed Granite 0 0 5 Contains 67% silicas and 19 trace minerals. Slow release over a long period of time.
    Rock Phosphate 0 3 0 Contains 11 trace minerals. Slow release over a long period of time.
    Epsom Salts 0 0 0 Provides Mg and acts as a balancer.
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    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Soil amendments and organic material

    source N P K comments
    Cornstalks 0.75 0.4 0.9 Break down slowly; excellent soil conditioner. Should be shredded.
    Oak Leaves 0.8 0.35 0.15 Break down slowly, shred for best results. Good soil conditioner.
    Feathers 15 0 0 Chop or shred finely for best results.
    Hair 14 0 0 Good soil conditioner, oils break down slowly. Chop or shred finely for best results.
    return to top


    .




    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Organic Fertilizers - Composition
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    .

    Organic soil composition involves creating a soil medium that has a balanced amount of nutrients - NPK as well as trace elements and minerals - plus organic material that provides food for not only the plant, but also the countless soil microorganisms, fungi, worms, and bacteria that comprise a healthy soil. This soil life breaks down the raw materials of the fertilizers you add so the plants can absorb them, and also plays a part in as-yet undefined processes that aid plant growth and improve soil health.

    Below are various "recipes" for both organic fertilizers and organic soil mixes.



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Mix and match formulas

    Pick one source from each category. The results will vary in composition from 1-2-1 to 4-6-3, but any mixture will provide a balanced supply of nutrients that will be steadily available to plants and encourage soil microorganisms.


    Nitrogen
    2 parts blood meal
    3 parts fish meal

    Phosporous
    3 parts bone meal
    6 parts rock phosphate or colloidal phosphate

    Potassium
    1 part kelp meal
    6 parts greensand


    .



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    .

    More Organic Fertilizer Mixes

    2 - 3.5 - 2.5
    1 part bone meal
    3 parts alfalfa hay
    2 parts greensand
    2 - 4 - 2
    4 parts coffee grounds
    1 part bone meal
    1 part wood ashes

    2 - 4 - 2
    1 part leather dust
    1 part bone meal
    3 parts granite dust
    2 - 8 - 2
    3 parts greensand
    2 parts seaweed
    1 part dried blood
    2 parts phosphate rock
    2 - 13 - 2.5
    1 part cottonseed meal
    2 parts phosphate rock
    2 parts seaweed
    3.5 - 5.5 - 3.5
    2 parts cottonseed meal
    1 part colloidal phosphate
    2 parts granite dust

    2.5 - 6 - 5
    1 part dried blood
    1 part phosphate rock
    4 parts wood ashes
    0 - 5 - 4
    1 part phosphate rock
    3 parts greensand
    2 parts wood ashes

    3 - 6 - 3
    1 part leather dust
    1 part phosphate rock
    3 parts seaweed
    3 - 7 - 5
    1 part dried blood
    1 part phosphate rock
    3 parts wood ashes

    3 - 8 - 5
    1 part leather dust
    1 part phosphate rock
    1 part fish scrap
    4 parts wood ashes
    2.5 - 2.5 - 4
    3 parts granite dust
    1 part dried blood
    1 part bone meal
    5 parts seaweed

    4 - 5 - 4
    2 parts dried blood
    1 part phosphate rock
    4 parts wood ashes
    6 - 8 - 3
    2 parts fish scrap
    2 parts dried blood
    1 part cottonseed meal
    1 part wood ashes
    1 part phosphate rock
    1 part granite dust




    Herbal Tea Plant Food

    1 t Comfrey leaves
    1 t Alfalfa leaves
    1 t Nettle leaves
    1 Qt boiling water


    Steep for 10 min. and let cool until luke warm. Drain the leaves out and add the luke warm tea to your plants to keep them healthy and vibrant!

    The reason for adding slightly warm tea (or water) to your plants is that they will be able to absorb the needed nutrients more easily by keeping the root pores open verses cold tea (or water) will have a tendency to restrict the pores, meaning a much slower process of absorption.

    Comfrey is called knitbone or healing herb. It is high in calcium, potassium and phosphorus, and also rich in vitamins A and C. The nutrients present in comfrey actually assist in the healing process since it contains allantoin.
    Alfalfa is one of the most powerful nitrogen - fixers of all the legumes. It is strong in iron and is a good source of phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and trace minerals.
    Nettles are helpful to stimulate fermentation in compost or manure piles and this helps to break down other organic materials in your planting soil. The plant is said to contail carbonic acid and ammonia which may be the fermentation factor. Nettles are rich in iron and have as much protein as cottonseed meal.
    I Was Indian Before Being Indian Was Cool.

  9. #9
    Tokin Indian ojibman's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by compash
    tocopherol... shelf life for alfalfa is forever, if its stored dry...

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Alfalfa releases triacontanol, an alcohol ester compound that acts as a growth stimulant. The alfalfa is not a food in the sense that nitrogen is, but it makes the uptake of nutrients more efficient. You'll have a dramatic increase in both growth, bloom, and overall vigour of the plant.

    2 cups Alfalfa pellets or meal.
    2.5 gal. water.
    steep for 2-3 days covered.


    ================================================== =
    http://www.minerva.at/search97cgi/s9...21_130417.html
    The effects of a long chain aliphatic alcohol 1-triacontanol (TRIA) on the photosynthesis and membrane properties of mesophyll protoplasts and chloroplasts isolated from pea leaves were studied. In vitro treatments of isolated protoplasts caused a large enhancement (166 percent) of the CO2-fixation rate after 60 min of TRIA (10 ^-6 M) application as compared to the control. An enhanced photosynthetic response was observed in vitro treated leaf pieces. Application of octacosanol (OCTA) under the same experimental conditions did not result in any stimulating effects. In vivo treatments of pea seedlings also resulted in a significant increase of the net CO2 uptake to 109% and 119% in 10^-8 M and 10 ^-6 M TRIA-treated plants respectively.
    Also get to read stuff like this and try your pan out once in awhile Always looking for an edge. Or sumpthin top thow in the pot.
    I Was Indian Before Being Indian Was Cool.

  10. #10
    NFT4me
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    ive used some growth and floweirng stimulants that contained amounts of triacontinal....i thought it was tricantonal, but i read too fast sometimes...
    its a hormone...,i think ive only seen it in flowering additives....but i may be wrong....
    sounds cool...alfalfa...
    you have alot of potental mixes there...ojibman....

    what if i grew alfalfa, and used it fresh would it still contain the tri. or does it need to dry and then the tri. is converted....similar to thc....

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