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Graywolf
03-31-2011, 10:17 AM
Here are some purdy ladies grown from stem cells in a special medium by our inhouse red headed geek, instead of seeds or clones. The stem cells are extracted from the stem nodes anywhere on the mother plant.

One of the advantages is that no diseases or systemic parasites are passed on.

Hee, hee, hee, snicker, snark, snort.....................

Guy_In_Pain
03-31-2011, 11:17 AM
GW how big are the tissue cultures when they start out? Are they recognizeable to the naked eye?

There is a future in this for any patient that has to follow plant numbers so keeping strains alive for future use is paramount. Where I am they deem a plant to be anything with roots so this is an excellent work around to keep genetics going without interfering with plant count.

And one last question, does it take a long time to begin to grow and look like cannabis, what about root growth?

Thanks for the post and always for the reply.

schmade420
04-01-2011, 01:29 AM
So fricking cool...I've been reading as much info on tissue culture as i can possibly find. Such a revolutionary concept being able to have thousands of strains on a shelf.

Lightly_Toasted
04-01-2011, 01:23 PM
Most definately interesting. I would like to know more on the subject as well :)

Graywolf
04-01-2011, 05:50 PM
GW how big are the tissue cultures when they start out? Are they recognizeable to the naked eye?

There is a future in this for any patient that has to follow plant numbers so keeping strains alive for future use is paramount. Where I am they deem a plant to be anything with roots so this is an excellent work around to keep genetics going without interfering with plant count.

And one last question, does it take a long time to begin to grow and look like cannabis, what about root growth?

Thanks for the post and always for the reply.

The meristem tissue culture starts are about a millimeter slice through a branch node. You can see them with the naked eye, but they are not recognizable as anything but a thin sliver of some kind of plant material.

The foliage that you see in the picture took less than a week in a nutrient solution with hormones and growth regulators.

It has to be put in a different solution to get it to root. It will never root in the current solution, just keep uptting off more harvestable starts.

You're welcome!

Graywolf
04-01-2011, 05:53 PM
Most definately interesting. I would like to know more on the subject as well :)


I'll keep ya'll updated on progress and it the whole thing works out, Growgeek promises to share the details and do a video.

Spuzzum
04-01-2011, 06:53 PM
Back in the 90's, High Times had an article of something "similar".. researcher scraped the younger, soft stems, then put the plant fibers/material into a container with rooting gel. The fibers eventually rooted and created new shoots.

rxb
04-02-2011, 12:39 PM
The tobacco industry has been playing with this for a while now and has some pretty good research available although it's pretty technical so very dry reading.

I'd be a little worried I cross contaminated something and ended up making the blob that ate L.A.... not that I'd miss L.A. really...

Dr Dave
04-02-2011, 02:12 PM
I'd be a little worried I cross contaminated something and ended up making the blob that ate L.A.... not that I'd miss L.A. really...


Lol, no one would miss it, plus I bet we could all band together and hunt down the giant cannabis blob and have free meds for years, woot!

rxb
04-02-2011, 03:34 PM
Lol, no one would miss it, plus I bet we could all band together and hunt down the giant cannabis blob and have free meds for years, woot!

Herd it into moonshine country and make Lake QWISO... I like it ;)

Lightly_Toasted
04-02-2011, 05:18 PM
My thoughts are to what other plants I could apply this to. I do a lot of plant rescues in my freetime, would be a possible way to save some that are in bad shape. Not to say that I won't master it and use it for cannabis as well :p

Rickkus
04-03-2011, 07:01 AM
Same procedure as orchids, I'd guess.

Lightly_Toasted
04-03-2011, 12:35 PM
I actually have read up on cloning orchids, most of what I found made for a very dry read and my brain just didn't want to absorb it. I seem to be a magnetfor sick orchids, had 18 at one point. Sad thing is they are actually very picky, but simple to care for. Maybe I shall attempt another read on the subject.

pflover
04-03-2011, 12:39 PM
awesome, is it possible to by the culture solution premade or do you have to create it yourself?

rxb
04-03-2011, 03:19 PM
you can get pre made and there are even all inclusive kits available. Just google "plant tissue culture" or add the word "kit" and there are tons of products. --r

carl
04-03-2011, 03:35 PM
i really like your posts graywolf and i would like to speak at length to you directly :)

inkog77
04-04-2011, 02:32 AM
are there any books about the subject ...

cresting tissue sample to form full grown plants

inkog77
04-04-2011, 04:23 PM
sorry bx just deleted mail.. been having problems with mail box in ty..... couple of time......s

,,, it been ongoing problem..

peace

Dr Dave
04-04-2011, 09:40 PM
i wonder a couple things... first how long does a tissue sample take to grow into a plant ready to veg, and two, can these samples be stored dormant without growing?

Graywolf
04-05-2011, 06:49 AM
My thoughts are to what other plants I could apply this to. I do a lot of plant rescues in my freetime, would be a possible way to save some that are in bad shape. Not to say that I won't master it and use it for cannabis as well :p

GG is using the techniques and culture solutions developed for Orchids and African Violet, which he also does. I'm not knowledgeable on what plants can and cannot be succeffully cultured this way, but I suspect most of them.

Graywolf
04-05-2011, 06:53 AM
awesome, is it possible to by the culture solution premade or do you have to create it yourself?


GG is buying both his culture mediums premade. Everything is simple and easy, though extreme measures are necessary keep everything sterile. So far he has lost only one culture solution to bread mold, but mold is the bete noir of culturing.

Graywolf
04-05-2011, 06:58 AM
you can get pre made and there are even all inclusive kits available. Just google "plant tissue culture" or add the word "kit" and there are tons of products. --r

True! You can also find the same process information GG found by Googling cannabis micro propogation protocol.

Graywolf
04-05-2011, 07:05 AM
i wonder a couple things... first how long does a tissue sample take to grow into a plant ready to veg, and two, can these samples be stored dormant without growing?

Since this is the first experiment GG has done with cannabis, I really don't know the answer yet. So far I can tell you that the meristematic tissue literally explodes with foliage once in the culture medium. Attached is the latest picture of a culture put up 3-18, so it is right at two weeks old. As you can see, it is ready to either take cuttings from or move it to a larger container.

It can also be moved to the rooting culture at this stage.

inkog77
04-06-2011, 02:09 PM
looking good

can you freeze like dooms day then use this shit to go ape...

Graywolf
04-07-2011, 03:21 PM
looking good

can you freeze like dooms day then use this shit to go ape...


Don't know! Maybe if it was fast frozen so as to not rupture the cells with ice crystals.

I added trying a liquid nitrogen freeze, followed by tissue culturing to the project list.

Lightly_Toasted
04-07-2011, 03:44 PM
Would really have to figure out the best storage method and get an idea of shelf life on the cuttings. Would refrigeration be a better method than freezing, as in just keeping it at a low temp so it stays dormant?

I know flash freezing is still not exact way to freeze something without damage. I have had my own adventures with liquid nitrogen in some of my computer overclocking projects. Fun and dangerous to play with :p

Lightly_Toasted
05-25-2011, 06:13 PM
Here is a link to a PDF posted on another site that relates to the subject. Gets more in depth and makes for a good read.

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=XXWP8GTX (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=XXWP8GTX)

If this link stops working, let me know, I have the PDF on my pc.

Fieldstone
06-07-2011, 04:03 PM
Thats look really helpfull and usefull and all arund fun . Great post ! Sure is fun loosing strains you cant get back . lol.

BurningBush
06-14-2011, 04:50 PM
That is crazy, the future i'll have a freezer full Of every strain's tissue sample then grow it?

Jred
12-09-2011, 05:48 PM
Anyone tried any tc experiments yet? Would be really nice to be mailed a whole variety of the 'elite' strains in a dish and not have worry about it being like the original or not.

Graywolf
12-10-2011, 01:58 PM
Growgeeks tissue culture experiments were interupted with a lab relocation, but progressed to the point of rooted plantlets. His new lab is currently still in the planning stages.

He and skunk pharms' Joe used the information gained from that experiment, to produce synthetic seeds from some LSD/White Widow meristem tissue, which we will soon be testing and reporting on.

Here are some followup shots of his cultured ladies, alas, including one culture lost to the heart break of penicilin mold.

Sorry I have no pictures of plants grown to maturity, as there were none.

I will post some information on artificial seeds, after they are tested and Joe has agreed to do a summary of our tissue culture experience to date.

I have also forwarded this link to Growgeek, whom has also agreed to update information on his experiment.

Jred
12-13-2011, 08:49 PM
Thanks Greywolf. Cant wait to see the project go through. Done some tissue culture in school back when and worked at a nursery which had a large tissue culture lab for nandinas of all varietys. Always been very interesting to me but not much work for that around here..

got2bme2
12-15-2011, 02:15 PM
To start Tissue culture you do need laminar flow hood or as for mushroom cultures a still air glove box. Just a heads up most Tissue culture labs have safe rooms and super air filtration systems etc. I watched a good size lab get a virus and it infected half of their cultures before they stopped it. Back in the seventies there was a Cali company Energy savers limited, they sold a kit with a plexy laminar flow hood, agar for cultures and all the tools. They sold lights etc. in Hightimes back in the 70s. That's were I first worked with it. Below is taken from Wiki not me. A added note test are being conducted on taking a cell from the center of a blueberry and making a vat of blueberry.

A Meristem is the tissue in most plants consisting of undifferentiated cells (meristematic cells), found in zones of the plant where growth can take place.

The meristematic cells give rise to various organs of the plant, and keep the plant growing. The Shoot Apical Meristem (SAM) gives rise to organs like the leaves and flowers. The cells of the apical meristems - SAM and RAM (Root Apical Meristem) - divide rapidly and are considered to be indeterminate, in that they do not possess any defined end fate. In that sense, the meristematic cells are frequently compared to the stem cells in animals, that have an analogous behavior and function.

The term meristem was first used in 1858 by Karl Wilhelm von Nägeli (1817–1891) in his book Beiträge zur Wissenschaftlichen Botanik.[1] It is derived from the Greek word merizein (μερίζειν), meaning to divide, in recognition of its inherent function.

In general, differentiated plant cells cannot divide or produce cells of a different type. Therefore, cell division in the meristem is required to provide new cells for expansion and differentiation of tissues and initiation of new organs, providing the basic structure of the plant body.

Meristematic cells are incompletely or not at all differentiated, and are capable of continued cellular division (youthful). Furthermore, the cells are small and protoplasm fills the cell completely. The vacuoles are extremely small. The cytoplasm does not contain differentiated plastids (chloroplasts or chromoplasts), although they are present in rudimentary form (proplastids). Meristematic cells are packed closely together without intercellular cavities. The cell wall is a very thin primary cell wall.

Maintenance of the cells requires a balance between two antagonistic processes: organ initiation and stem cell population renewal.

Later
B